Millipedes & Centipedes - School IPM - USU Extension

    Millipedes and Centipedes

    Diplopoda; Chilopoda

    Millipede

    Adult millipede (Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org)

    centipede

    Adult centipede (Joseph Burger, Bugwood.org)

    Centipede

    House centipede (Joseph Burger, Bugwood.org)

    Identification

    millipedes:

    • 1/16 inch to 2 inches long (commonly); rounded
    • dark brown to gray, sometimes clear
    • two pair of legs per segment
    • common in pest monitors; curl up when dead

    centipedes:

    • 1/8 inch to 2 inches long (commonly); flatter
    • yellowish to brown
    • one pair of legs per segment

    Nesting Habits

    millipedes:

    • lay eggs in soil or organic material
    • need high moisture

    centipedes:

    • areas of high moisture, especially in basements, wash rooms, etc.
    • under bark, under organic material, under rocks, etc.

    Diet

    • millipedes: decaying/moist organic material
    • centipedes: predatory on other insects and spiders

    Significance

    • can be a nuisance indoors
    • presence of either indicates a moisture issue inside or outside of the building
    • not a health risk

    IPM Recommendations

    • Reduce or eliminate moisture issues indoors and outdoors.
    • Exclude entry via caulking, weather stripping, door sweeps, screens, etc.
    • Vacuum when present.