Monitoring - School IPM - USU Extension

    Monitoring

    If aren't monitoring, you aren't practicing IPM. Monitoring is the backbone of an IPM program because it allows you to assess the types and numbers of pests in and around your buildings. Monitoring is an easy for the Health Department to assess that your school or district is practicing IPM, as well. The Health Department will be looking for an active monitoring program when entering schools. This includes pest monitors placed properly in Pest Vulnerable Areas (PVAs), with accompanying data sheets. Traps should be checked every 2 to 4 weeks and pests on the traps should be recorded. Traps that are old, dirty, or missing should be replaced immediately. To identify pests on/in the monitoring devices, follow your pest identification procedures. The Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Lab is always available to assist you with pest identification (ryan.davis@usu.edu).

    Plans should include a section on how pest monitoring will occur and the types of data that will be recorded during the monitoring program. This would also be a good spot to include information on inspections and segue into a section on pest action thresholds.

    The number of mouse-traps, glue traps, exterior tamper-resistant rodent bait stations and flying insect traps, yellow jacket traps or any other kind of hardware required will be determined by the IPM Contractor after the initial building/site inspections. This will allow the school or district's building management to approve the necessary expenses on the monitoring cost.
     
    Sticky monitors, glue traps, mechanical mouse traps, outside rodent bait stations, insect pheromone traps, flying insect traps and visual inspections will be used to monitor and identify infestation zones as new pests are discovered or conditions change.

    Monitoring Basics

    Glue, or sticky traps/boards (monitors) are a simple, effective, and passive way to monitor for pests. Monitors work 24-7 to monitor for pests. There are various sizes and shapes and some come with attractive chemicals (pheromones) for specific pests. Choose the monitor that best fits your program or particular situation.

    Monitors provide a lot of information about pests in your building. When placing traps, remember to write the date, room/bldg., and location on the monitor, and record that information on a pest monitoring data sheet.

    When traps become dirty, full, or lose their stickiness, they should be replaced (~ about 3 months). See page 2 for tips on using monitors.
    *Preferably, sticky traps/glue boards should not be used to monitor for, or kill mice or rats. There are other devices for rodent monitoring or trapping, which are discussed in the Pest Press fact sheet “Trapping and Baiting for Mice and Rats.”

    Monitoring Tips

    • place against walls or windows
    • adhere monitors to ground, if needed
    • avoid placement where children have easy access
    • use an extendable mirror to push and pull
    • monitors out of hard-to-reach areas
    • inform teachers of trap placement and reason
    • use 20-40 monitors depending on school size

    Monitor Placement

    • in food storage and general storage areas
    • under sinks, food prep areas, and desks
    • near floor drain 
    • in lower panels of serving counters
    • behind/under appliances/furniture
    • in drawers
    • under lockers
    • near backpack storage
    • near pet food or potted plants
    • near boilers or under equipment
    • near utility pipes without escutcheons
    • anywhere there are cracks or crevices
    • place many traps for fine-scale monitoring
    • relocate traps that don’t catch anything

    Example of a Monitoring Plan

    Pest monitoring is the backbone of an IPM program because it allows managers to assess the types and numbers of pests in and around buildings. Pest Vulnerable Areas (PVAs) will be assessed during initial building inspections and using building floor plans. Monitors will be placed properly in Pest Vulnerable Areas (PVAs), and data will be recorded on the date, location, and technician name. Traps will be checked every 2 to 4 weeks and pests on the traps will be recorded on the pest monitor data sheet. Potential pests of health concern will be assessed by the IPM Coordinator after notification by the head custodian or site coordinator. Actionable pests will be promptly addressed by the IPM Coordinator. Traps that are old, dirty, or missing will be replaced immediately. To identify pests on/in the monitoring devices, we will follow our pest identification procedures. For pests that we cannot confidently identify we will contact the Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Lab to assist with pest identification (ryan.davis@usu.edu).

    Sticky monitors, glue traps, mechanical mouse traps, outside rodent bait stations, insect pheromone traps, flying insect traps and visual inspections will be used to monitor and identify infestation zones as new pests are discovered or conditions change.

    Data Collection

    Our monitoring program will record the following data:

    • trap number
    • date placed
    • name of technician(s) who placed monitor
    • building, room and location within room where the monitor was placed 
    • number of sticky traps
    • number of mouse traps/monitoring tamper-resistant bait stations
    • number of other traps used indoor and outdoors in playgrounds, ornamental plantings, or turf
    • identity of pest(s) on trap
    • identify life stages on traps (eggs, immatures, adults)
    • pest direction (which direction are majority of the insects coming from, if obvious)
    • increase or decrease in trap catches
    • record if a trap was missing, damaged, or old
    • record a new trap number to replace those traps

    Thresholds

    Pest management thresholds will be determined based on the pest species and on the site/situation. Additional tips for determining thresholds can be found here

    Pest Management Assessment

    Pest monitors will also be used to help assess pest management success. While corrective actions are being taken to mitigate a pest issue, monitors will be used to help determine if pest populations are increasing or declining, which can be a measure of program success or if the program needs revision for a more effective strategy. 

    Additional information regarding a monitoring program that is specific to your school or district can also be entered here.