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    Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

    Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

    New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar.

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    Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

    Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

    Scientists studying a valuable, but vulnerable, species of poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species' inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease. Their finding could lead to more successful hybrid poplar varieties for increased biofuels and forestry production and protect native trees against infection.

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    The Best Look Yet at the Tiny Fungus Storage Units Inside Ambrosia BeetlesPage Title

    The Best Look Yet at the Tiny Fungus Storage Units Inside Ambrosia BeetlesPage Title

    Researchers at the University of Florida have found that newer methods of micro-CT scanning and laser ablation tomography offer some unique advantages in observing the extremely small organs of insects.

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    Migrating Monarchs Facing Increased Parasite Risks

    Migrating Monarchs Facing Increased Parasite Risks

    During their annual migration to wintering sites in Mexico, monarch butterflies encounter dangers ranging from cars and trucks to storms, droughts and predators. A study led by ecologists at the University of Georgia has found evidence that these iconic insects might be facing a new challenge.

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    In Search of Soybeans Resistant to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

    In Search of Soybeans Resistant to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

    The invasive brown marmorated stink bug "will eat almost anything." Among its targets is soybean, the number-two crop in the United States. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service are working to identify soybean breeds that exhibit resistance to the pest.

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    Butterfly Color Patterns Reveal Clues About the Genes That Build Insect Wings

    Butterfly Color Patterns Reveal Clues About the Genes That Build Insect Wings

    Researchers at the University of Manitoba studied color patterns in various species of butterflies, including painted ladies (Vanessa cardui), and the underlying genes that drive those patterns, revealing a previously undetected compartment boundary that may exist in the wings of all holometabolous insects.

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    Are cities affecting evolution?

    Are cities affecting evolution?

    In the first study to take a comprehensive look at the way urbanization is affecting evolution, researchers say they've found a 'wake-up call for the public, governments and other scientists.'

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    Tumbling Bee Populations Linked to Fungicides

    Tumbling Bee Populations Linked to Fungicides

    When a team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides. Instead, they found a shocker: fungicides, commonly thought to have no impact.

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    Short Bait Exposure Provides Control of Asian Subterranean Termite Colonies

    Short Bait Exposure Provides Control of Asian Subterranean Termite Colonies

    Termites cause huge economic costs to society--as much as $40 billion per year worldwide. In the southeastern United States, two invasive species, the Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) and the Asian subterranean termite (Coptotermes gestroi) are causing increasing economic losses.

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    Disease resistance successfully spread from modified to wild mosquitoes

    Disease resistance successfully spread from modified to wild mosquitoes

    Using genetically modified mosquitoes to reduce or prevent the spread of disease is a rapidly expanding field of investigation. One challenge is ensuring that GM mosquitoes can mate with their wild counterparts so the desired modification is spread in the wild population. Investigators have engineered mosquitoes with an altered microbiota that suppresses human malaria-causing parasites. These GM mosquitoes preferred to mate with wild mosquitoes and passed the desired protection to offspring.

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