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Rising Concerns Over Tree Pests and Diseases

Science Daily

Nov. 15, 2013 —

New research has found that the number of pests and disease outbreaks in trees and forests across the world has been increasing.

The review "The consequences of Tree Pests and Diseases for Ecosystem Services" by scientists from the universities of Southampton, Cambridge, Oxford and St Andrews was published the 15 of November in the journal Science...

...Trees and forests provide a wide variety of ecosystem services in addition to timber, food, and other provisioning services, such as carbon sequester and storage, reducing flood risk and leisure use. The researchers say that new approaches to pest and disease management are needed that take into account these multiple services and the different stakeholders they benefit, as well as the likelihood of greater threats in the future resulting from globalisation and climate change.

However, identifying all species that may become pests will be impossible and researchers stress the importance of risk management at "pathways of introduction," especially where modern trade practices provide potential new routes of entry for pests and pathogens. They argue that science-based policy and practice can prevent the introduction of new diseases and improve recovery and ongoing management, this includes the breeding of resistant trees and development of effective bio-control systems.

One of the review authors Peter Freer-Smith, who is a visiting Professor in the Centre for Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton, said: "Modern pest and disease management for plants and the natural environment needs to be based on an extensive science base. We need to understand the molecular basis of pathogenicity and herbivores, as well as why some species reach epidemic prevalence and abundance"...

read more at sciencedaily.com

read the review at sciencemag.org