Leaf Scorch of Trees

Utah Pest Fact Sheet

USU Extension/Plant Pest Diagnostic Lab

Utah Plant Disease Control No. 20

 Revised January 1998


 

Leaf Scorch of Trees

Sherman V. Thomson/Extension Plant Pathologist
Scott C. Ockey/Plant Disease Diagnostician
 
 

Ash leaf with scorch symptoms.
Ash leaf with scorch symptoms. Many times leaves will begin to show scorch symptoms at the margins followed by interveinal scorching. Younger leaves are normally affected before older leaves.
Tree leaves with severe summer leaf scorch.
Plane tree leaves with severe summer leaf scorch. Both leaves show the characteristic intervienal necrosis, common in most shade trees with large leaves.
Maple leaves with scorch symptoms.
Maple leaves with scorch symptoms caused by an iron deficiency. Scorch due to iron deficiency can often be confused with summer leaf scorch. When this deficiency is the cause of the scorch, addition of a chelated iron compound in addition to irrigation management is the recommended control.

Leaf Scorch of Trees

Leaf scorch is a physiological disease of plants which occurs when the roots are unable to obtain sufficient water to supply the top of the plant. Leaf scorch occurs when plants are transpiring rapidly during periods of high temperatures with hot, dry winds or during droughts. Any plant may experience this, but symptoms are more commonly seen on broadleaf trees such as maple, ash, elm, chestnut and poplar.

 

 

 


















































Precautionary Statement: All pesticides have benefits and risks, however following the label will maximize the benefits and reduce risks. Pay attention to the directions for use and follow precautionary statements. Pesticide labels are considered legal documents containing instructions and limitations. Inconsistent use of the product or disregarding the label is a violation of both federal and state laws. The pesticide applicator is legally responsible for proper use. This publication is issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work. Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Vice President for Extension and Agriculture, Utah State University.